Research

With its innovative Clinical Trials Network, influential annual meeting and high-impact journals, SNMMI encourages and facilitates research and science for the nuclear medicine and molecular imaging field. Learn more.

Clinical Trials Network

The Clinical Trials Network (CTN) provides tools and resources to promote faster, more cost-effective drug development and increase the availability and performance of molecular imaging radiopharmaceuticals for use in the clinic. Our Mission is to advance the use of molecular imaging agents in clinical trials through standardization of chemistry and imaging methodology. This includes using imaging radiopharmaceuticals during the course of drug development, as well as bringing new radiopharmaceuticals to regulatory approval. Programs developed over the past 5 years include a comprehensive registry of qualified imaging sites and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers, a robust scanner validation program, access to standardized imaging protocols and a very strong clinical research education curriculum.

LATEST NEWS

  • July 20, 2017Neuroendocrine Tumor Research Foundation Grant Opportunities
    NETRF is requesting applications for a new round of scientific and clinical research grants for advancing the treatment of and search for cures to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The grants, which will take effect in 2018, vary from $50,000 to $1.2 million and fall into three categories: accelerator grants, investigator grants, and pilot project grants. Some are available for as many as four years.
  • July 19, 2017Brain scans may change care for some people with memory loss
    Findings, reported Wednesday, mark a first peek at a huge study under way to help determine if Medicare should start paying for specialized PET scans that find a hallmark of Alzheimer's — a sticky plaque called amyloid.For now, in addition to people who qualify for the IDEAS study, the Alzheimer's Association and Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging say unusually young dementia patients, younger than 65, also might be candidates for a PET scan. The scans shouldn't be used as a screening tool for people without symptoms or who worry they're at risk. Nor are they for people who can be diagnosed by standard means, or to determine disease severity.
  • July 10, 2017Radiotherapy Dose Increase to PET/CT-Identified Hypoxic NSCLC Lesions Shows Need for New Approaches
    Fluorine-18-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) is a PET radiotracer that is widely used to diagnose hypoxia (insufficient oxygen supply to tissue), and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with FMISO uptake are known to face a poor prognosis. A multicenter French Phase II study featured in the July issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine investigated whether a selective radiotherapy dose increase to tumor areas with significant FMISO uptake in NSCLC patients could improve outcomes.
  • July 6, 2017Novel PET Tracer Detects Small Blood Clots
    Blood clots in veins and arteries can lead to heart attack, stroke, and pulmonary embolism, which are major causes of mortality. In the featured article of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine’s July 2017 issue, German researchers show that targeting GPIIb/IIIa receptors, the key receptor involved in platelet clumping, with a fluorine-18 labeled ligand is a promising approach for diagnostic imaging.
  • June 14, 2017Prostate PET/CT Targets More Cancer and Improves Patient Care
    An estimated one in seven American men will be affected by prostate cancer in their lifetime. Prostate-specific molecular imaging gives these men a fighting chance, especially if their cancer returns, according to research revealed at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).
  • June 14, 2017Dual-agent PET/MR With Time of Flight Detects More Cancer
    Simultaneous injections of the radiopharmaceuticals fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) followed by quantitative scanning significantly improves image quality and detection of bone metastases at a lower dose, according to research presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).
  • June 14, 2017SNMMI Image of the Year: PET and Optical Imaging of Dual-Labeled PSMA Inhibitors Shows Promise for Prostate Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy
    In the battle against metastatic prostate cancer, the removal of lymph node metastases using image-guided surgery may have a high clinical impact on outcomes. Researchers at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) demonstrated preclinically that dual-labeled PSMA-inhibitors based on PSMA-11 enhance preoperative staging, using PET/CT followed by fluorescence-guided surgery. The combined approach results in more accurate detection of PSMA-positive tumor lesions.
  • June 13, 2017Immuno-PET Shows Promise for Detecting and Treating Pancreatic Tumors
    A first-in-human study presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) demonstrates the feasibility and safety of the novel human monoclonal antibody HuMab-5B1 with highly specific targeting for the cancer antigen (CA) 19-9, which is expressed on pancreatic tumors and a variety of other malignancies, including small cell lung cancer and tumors of the gastrointestinal system. It holds the promise of better identifying tumors and directing treatment.

Preclinical Imaging

CMIIT’s mission is to engage the molecular imaging community and leverage the SNMMI infrastructure to advance the adoption of emerging molecular imaging technologies and probes in preclinical and clinical applications. One of the goals is to develop educational resources for a “translational researcher”. CMIIT will provide researchers with needed education and training on the “nuts and bolts” of translating and transitioning an agent or technique from pre-clinical research into the clinical practice such as tracer development, equipment, and funding.

The Nuclear Medicine Clinical Trial Group, LLC

Under the auspices of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the Nuclear Medicine Clinical Trial Group(NMCTG) assists industry partners and academic investigators in managing clinical research activities.  Its goals include ensuring quality imaging is conducted in drug or diagnostic clinical trials and providing training for molecular imaging professionals performing clinical research. Many of the programs established under the Clinical Trials Network, such as its robust Education Program, provide support to the NMCTG to help carry out its mission.